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Full text of "Elchanet (New York, N.Y.), 1962"

the ELCHANET 

1962 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/elchanet1962unse 




Yeshiva University High School for Girls 
of Manhattan 

462 West 58 Street 
New York, N. Y. 



THE ELCHANET '62 



THE SALUTATION OF THE DAWN 



Listen to the Exhortation of the Dawn! 

Look to this Day! 
For it is Life, the very Life of Life. 
In its brief course He all the Verities 

and realities of your Existence: 



The Bliss of Growth, 
The Glory of Action, 
The Splendor of Beauty. 



For Yesterday is but a Dream, 
And To-morrow is only a Vision; 
To-day well-lived makes every Yesterday 

a dream of Happiness, 
And every To-morrow a Vision of Hope. 
Look well therefore to this Day! 
Such is the Salutation of the Dawn. 



(from the Sanskrit, 
of Unknown Authorship) 



The Gifts of Dawn 

The prophets of doom are many. Their voices sound the knell 
of destruction. Throughout long centuries ravaged by strife and 
conflicting passions, they have presaged the extinction of hu- 
manity. 

Since the beginning of his existence, man has been the un- 
willing victim of nature's forces, forever battling the capricious 
elements which seek to dominate and destroy him. hHe has strug- 
gled against oppressive environments, and fought his fellow man 
in a ceaseless search for power and immortality, seeking to quench 
the springs of ambition that flow in his soul. The greatest duel, 
however, has been between man and the forces within himself. 
He has perpetually sought to rule over his will, to be master of 
his fate and author of his destiny. These struggles are the essence 
of man, they are the signs of ruin to the prophets of disaster. 
Humanity, however, has repudiated these false seers, for It has 
emerged triumphant from the battlefield of life's eternal wars. 

The symbol of man's struggles and his ultimate victory is the 
morning Dawn. The rising sun brings with it warmth, light, and an 
end to the darkness of the night; but it also carries within its 
shimmering rays a message to mankind — the twin concepts of 
creation and eternity. Each day there Is a new Dawn, a phenome- 
non of nature, which, paradoxically, is as old as the world itself, and 
which will continue to exist until the end of that universe. Man, 
too, represents this concept. Humanity has faced the same chal- 
lenges and fought the same battles since the beginning of time. 
The battles against nature, fellow man, and himself have never 
ceased nor failed to occupy men's thoughts or direct their actions. 



Yet, with each new generation there arise new challenges to test 
man's ingenuity and nnoral strength. The challenges of the space 
age, nuclear weapons, and technology are characteristic of a new 
era unknown to mankind one hundred years ago; and the way we 
meet and conquer these challenges today will influence the future 
of tomorrow. 

Aurora, the rosy-hued Dawn, signifies the end of darkness 
and the beginning of a new day — a new life. This renewal of light 
each day is the promise of Dawn and causes "hope to spring 
eternal in the human breast." It is this hope, this faith, this gift of 
Dawn — G-d's creation — that is man's salvation. That and man's 
indomitable will to survive are why humanity exists today, despite 
the obstacles and struggles that seek to vanquish It. 

What is true of all mankind is, perhaps, even more true of the 
Jew. h^e has had to struggle against the Intolerance of man and 
the persecution of nations. He has witnessed the enslavement, the 
exile, and the genocide of his people; but, because of his deep 
and imperishable belief in G-d and hlis Torah, he has emerged 
triumphant, with dignity and greatness. Judaism, too, embraces 
the concepts of birth and eternity. With each generation our 
ancient religion is imbued with new life — in a sense, given a new 
Dawn. Yet, the original spirit and meaning of Judaism remains to 
guide us through future decades. 

Love of G-d and man is the heritage of the Jewish people. 
It is a heritage that we the graduates of 1962 are proud to bear 
as we join our people and all mankind in the endless struggles 
of Life. 

FELICE HAMADA 






whose hair 



TO HIM 

we helped 

turn gray 




from the administration 



Dear Graduates: 

I am pleased to extend my warmest greetings to the first graduating class of the 
Yeshiva University High School for Girls of Manhattan. Yours will always be the rare 
distinction of being the pioneers that will serve as an inspiration for all future students. 
The progress you have shown, both intellectually and spiritually, is a tribute to your 
ability. 

I hope that in your future endeavors you will continue to be a source of pride and 
inspiration to your families and that the ideals you received at the High School for Girls 
will enable you to fulfill your noble roles as "mothers in Israel" and sources of leadership 
in the Jewish community. 

SAMUEL BELKIN 
President, Yeshiva University 





Dear Graduates: 

On this joyous occasion in your lives, when you have reached an important mile- 
stone in your preparation for the fullness of the days to come, I am happy to greet you 
and to wish you well. You have completed successfully the course of studies prescribed 
in the English and Hebrew departments in our High School — some with distinction — 
all with credit to yourselves, your parents, and to our great institution. During the most 
formative years of your lives, you have actively participated in the harmonious blending 
and fusion of Jewish lore and secular learning. 

Whether you choose as your life's work some phase of human knowledge and 
dedicate yourselves to study and teaching, or give your energies to the fields of daily 
human needs, or devote yourselves to the realm of the spirit, remember the philosophy 
and the way of life that you have been taught here. Although the problems that you, 
as Jews, must face in this confused world are not always clear, you must, each and all 
of you, cling to those elements of our cultural past that have made us great as a people. 

You, graduates of Yeshiva University High School for Girls (Manhattan) have had 
an education different from that of the rest of the Jewish youth in this country. You ha\e 
had an opportunity to learn the value and significance of intense Jewish study, and to 
gain a deeper insight into a truer understanding of the Jewish consciousness and soul. 
With this great common bond, you are strengthened to withstand the material influences 
of the time, and are less prone to fall prey to the disintegrating forces which are 
threatening to sweep away everything that is dear and precious in life. Strengthen that 
bond; unite, assert yourselves and your influence in the lives of our youth, so that by 
your example you may pro\e that these }-cars in Yeshi\'a University High School ha\-e 
not been in vain, and that the instruction and the inspiration you receive here shall be 
a blessing to you and to those who are to be influenced by you. 

SHELLEY R. SAPHIRE 

Director, Yeshiva University High Schools 




man'? main nsDrrn'a nx a'oii-Ti naii^a ma"Dan mTa^nn':' 

— -D''Dn3''3ix-nn'''i:?'' t'-'?se? 
! nsnai m'?^' 
aiy'' anpa rrnaiy .ubi:? ma^oa- 'pii^ njiwxnn nsiapn ,inx 

.msD-D'a nx 
nim3 rpn-' ma^'cn ''?3X ,xin tup r^'n- nia"Dan Vii; "isoan 

.p'lnx naxiariE' minx'? inin nx mxia inx '3 •p'? 
n'tt'x-i//- imx3 pnx nan ,'ni'' ma"Dan nsoa nivxa ,T'nya 
.'^nDaia .i:rmay nx i:'7nnn ix nu;x3 i:i20"n''3'7 oioiw "nysan 
."ixa nji2?'// i:n3D-n'a na^xa pnx istje' 
nans pa nnx '^3 .n'^ni nmnx p''?? n'7''Da it maiyi 
'j-'ya' nr ay aii'nnn? nans x'- .mn:;n iyxn3 maiy x'nr nyi'? 
.mai niT'arn'? nsmi wa^i:-' Tnya i3'u?ya .na nsDn-n'3 
'T Dyi3 •'-■' .onuixa rn' n"na i3nyx 'jsiy ]3nx inaa 'ax 

.pia' p'T iT^^yai pi'7y 

ri'7 PHS' T'T 



Dear Graduates: 

My sincerest congratulations to you, the first graduating class of the newest of the 
high schools of Yeshiva University. As pace setters for a student body which will 
number over 350 next term, you have had a tremendous responsibility and, by and large, 
acquitted yourselves with distinction. 

I recall very vividly our first school term a little less than three years ago. As the 
oldest class, a role which was yours until now, it was your task to provide the necessary 
leadership for the many facets which make up student government. This year book, the 
many successful G.O. affairs, and the traditions which you have handed over to the 
lower class students attest to your success. 

Scholastically, it has been the aim of the Yeshiva to provide you with a balanced 
program of traditional religious subjects and varied general studies. The main objective 
of the Yeshiva has been to graduate a modern Jewish woman, who is endowed with a 
deep understanding of the prime ethical and practical values of our ancient tradition, 
but yet is aware of the need to adjust to contemporary living. While in a heterogeneous 
group like yourselves, scholastic achievement and moral influences may vary, it is 
our hope that the majority of you will remember the vitality of our cultural heritage, 
and that many of the "abstractions" discussed in your classes actually can be applied to 
everyday experiences. In this sense you will attest to the need for religious secondary 
education of girls and the timely action of Yeshiva University in expanding its educa- 
tional program for women. 

I have confidence in your integrity and good sense and wish you well in all your 
future undertakings. 

MARTIN LILKER 
Administrator 




"He discovereth deep things out of dark- 
ness, and bringeth them out to light . . ." 




FACULTY 




Mr. S. Cohen 




Miss E. Rudoff 





Dr. J. Friedenberg 




Miss L. Illig 




Mrs. M. Strauss 




Miss G. LafFargue 




Mr. L. Klein 



Mrs. E. Levinson 



GENERAL 



10 




Miss P. Preiser 




Mrs. F. Chrystall 



MISSING; 
Mr. I. Edelman 
Miss E. Obrien 




Miss C. Adierblum 




Miss I Marks 




Mr. H. Petersilie 



STUDIES 





Mrs. R. Stern 




Mrs. R. Turtz 



11 




Miss N. Rabinowitz 






Mr. A. Eliezri 



Rabbi A. Metzger 




Rabbi S. Teitelbaum 



HEBREW 



Miss J. Guncler 



STUDIES 



12 



OFFICE 




Miss D. Keehn 




Juhnny L;iboy 



MAINTENANCE 




■Chick" 



13 




GRADUATES 



14 




"Youth is life as yet untouched . . ." 



15 



MYRIL ADAMS 



Myril is a girl who can keep any- 
one laughing and has success- 
fully applied her fine sense of 
humor to many class assemblies 
and productions. Her athletic 
talents have also enlivened our 
school s teams. We wish her 
every success as she roresakes 
these portals for Hunter College. 

Baskethall; committees 




Sn^Ja 



X\)iin '2B2 i?]iun im rn 



'n1>^s^)2 



niju HTDDn nn 



16 




SUZAN ALPERT 



Coming here from Hi-Li in the 
middle of her sophomore year, 
Suzan had no difficulty adjusting 
to our school and making friends. 
Known for her ever-ready smile, 
her optimism, and her abilities as 
class treasurer, she has often of- 
fered a helping hand to many ac- 
tivities. 

Class treasurer; Guild volunteer 



ni3^Ja 



DTHH nnoj^ iwRn niD r^ 




MELODYE ASHENBERG 



Her bubbling personality, whisp- 
ered sarcasms, and ready laugh 
have made Melodye the target of 
many a teacher s scowl, and won 
for her many a class admirer. 
Coming from a family of five, 
she has already gained enough 
practical experience to make her 
mark as a school teacher. 

Cheering squad; volleyball 



SHAYNEE BECKER 



Shaynee's dedication to many 
school activities has made her 
one of the most admired mem- 
bers of our class. Master sergeant 
of the keep-the-school-clean bri- 
gade, toter of the candid camera, 
unselfish director of volunteers 
for the Jewish Guild for the 
Blind, her success as a social 
worker is a foregone conclusion. 

Arista; photographer, Elchanet; 
manager, sennce squad; manager, 
Guild volunteers; booster 




nrw 






17 




np^noj — n?3Dn^ j^d 



n^i£3i^ 



im uRin nmu mujni 



FELICIA CHANES 



One of the few to achieve a suc- 
cessful flip, Felicia is widely 
envied for her curly hair which 
every clay sports a different style 
and colorful bow. Her reputation 
as a yarmulka maker is also well- 
known. Transferring from Brook- 
lyn Central in her junior year, 
she immediately gained admit- 
tance to Miss Keehn's '8:30 
Club — a distinction. 

Guild volunteer; committees 



naio 




GLADYS COHEN 



Highly spirited, always smiling, 
and an avid baseball fan, this 
"D" train rider from The Bronx 
is equally adept at spilling choco- 
late milk and getting herself 
elected to the school's honor so- 
ciety. The class has rewarded 
Gladys' abilities by electing her 
to various offices; she has never 
made anyone regret the decision. 



Arista; treasurer, 
vice-president 



CO.; class 



18 



RACHEL COHEN 



JACQUELINE FRIEDMAN 



Graduating at an eligible age, 
Ricki is tlie first born of tbe class. 
Her own "basic ' ideas of fash- 
ions liave caused Mr. Lilker to 
despair of ever recreating the days 
when skirts were worn two inches 
below the knees. Ricki's hvely 
spirit is sure to bring her suc- 
cess. 

Captain, basketball; captain, vol- 
leyball; class secretary 



Managing to entertain us all (in- 
cluding M.L.) for the past three 
years, this human dynanfo is for- 
ever pushing some project or ac- 
tivity. Jackie s vim and vigor 
have been a valuable asset to our 
school s athletic teams. We re 
sure that some ardent Zionist 
will soon whisk our lovable live- 
wire right out of circulation. 



Business manager, Elchanel ;ath- 
letic manager; captain, basket- 
ball; captain, volleyball : leader, 
chalil club 




hm 



Dn DTIT D'JHD 







19 




nn^is3 



nnDn R)iT) din nwu 







FELICE HAMADA 



JANET HERSH 



An enthusiast of John Kennedy s 
election victory and a member 
of the "intelhgensia,' Felice was 
even able to mesmerize Mr. Liiker 
as she shd through his World 
History exams. Her distinctive 
classroom slouch and deceivingly 
naive comments have been a 
source of amusement to her 
friends. Felice's literary interest 
and gift for writing compete with 
her love for political science as 
she maps her future. 

Arista; literary editor, Elchanet; 
literary editor. Courier; CO.; 
basketball 



This girl with the "peaches and 
cream " complexion proves that 
good things come in small pack- 
ages. Displaying grace and high 
spirits, Janet indulges in many 
interests, ranging from acting to 
dancing a roaring Charleston or 
modern twist. Her main ambition 
is to be a U.N. translator after 
picking up a degree in languages 
at N.Y.U. 

Captain, cheering squad; coach, 
boosters; leader, Hebrew dance 
club 



20 



MINA HOROWITZ 



SANDRA HOROWITZ 



Demure, sincere, modest, and one 
of Mr. Steif s favorites in Jewish 
History class, Mina is known for 
her skill at taking precise notes. 
Daughter of a renowned cantor, 
she has interests in Hebrew danc- 
ing. She will undoubtedly prove 
to be a true Eishet Cliayil. 

CO.; clubs 



A sentimental t>'pe who even 
saves the feathers of her late 
parakeet. Sandy is great company 
and a loyal friend. A future math 
teacher, she enjoys this field im- 
mensely and can tackle most 
problems with ease. Sandy in- 
tends to continue her studies at 
Hunter College, and we \vish 
this Bronxite success. 



Arista, vice-president, 
committees 



CO.; 



in in'' D^iju^ 



nii^T? mji DiuD'? nojR 



nT>2 



rrw 





21 



nnnn n^ lunri nun inrn 



D^jg TD^-' moj 2^ 



nanr 



na^'-rj? 





VIVIAN KALISH 



ADELE LEVINE 



The only natural platinum 
monde in the class, Vivian is 
widely envied for this G-d given 
asset. This New Jersey commuter 
was the first to sport contact 
lenses and the first to get her 
driver s license. Her scholastic 
honors and eager participation 
in school activities lead us to a 
simple but meaningful tribute: 
' Vive la Vivian! 

Chapter president. Arista; presi- 
dent, CO.; treasurer, CO.; cap- 
tain, basketball; volleyball; class 
president 



Whether her name be distorted 
to Deli or Aide!, this girl s 
sincerity and willingness to lend 
a helping hand could never be 
changed. She still amazes us in 
being able to keep organized 
without a pocketbook. A cham- 
pion ping-pong player, Adele has 
won many games and many 
friends here. 

Volleyball; leader, Hebrew dance 
club; librarian 



22 



iiN^ nojpi uiTiQJV inn 



irujn 'PunD ddh tn 



no^n 



Vnn 



r 


— 'i 


( 


JE^p 


1 


^^^K )^ m 








^^' 


■ / 






HELENE LIPSTADT 



RHODA MILLER 



A fantastic consumer of stuffed 
celery and green pepper, Helanie 
can never resist nasching some- 
one else s lunch. Tfiis flasny red- 
head lias discovered that a girl s 
best weapon can often be a pro- 
lific polysyllabic vocabulary, and 
she hopes to put it to good use 
as a historical researcher a la 
Schlesinger. Her literary back- 
ground and writing talents should 
also prove invaluable. 

Editor-in-chiej, Courier; cheer- 
ing squad; Guild volunteer; lib- 
rarian 



Overflowing with school spirit 
and creative talents, Rhoda has 
been a prime contributor to her 
class and her school. Her vivaci- 
ous personality is evident, but it 
has never outshone her gifts as 
artist, writer, orator, director, and 
expert crossword puzzler. This 
school is going to miss her. 

Art and layout editor, Elchanet; 
art editor, Courier; secretary, 
CO.; cheering squad; hashetball 



23 



ZIPORA MILNER 



FRANCES PINCUS 



Another of the - train - from - 
Queens-was-Iate girls. Tzippy has 
spent many a lunch hour trying 
to escape from a certain pubnca- 
tion's faculty advisor. She takes 
time, however, to catch her breath 
during many a class, while nnal 
exam days find her in hot pursuit 
of someone with a good set of 
notes. As one who thinks for 
herself, Tzippy should have no 
difficulty making her future suc- 
cessful. 

Editor, Hamvaser; CO. 



Often frightened by Mr. Steif's 
shouting about his "pinkos," Fran 
has charmed her classmates with 
her quiet sincerity. Highly skilled 
attendance taker of the senior 
class, Fran has fulfilled her obli- 
gations as class secretary with 
distinction. Her scholastic suc- 
cess augurs well for her future 
endeavors. 

Service squad; class secretary; 
Guild volunteer 



nn N^n^ nmoji \mw 



micu'? "pu TDn nnin 



m)tix 



nnis^ 





24 





nsn 



nin 



in m"- niu "PDQj 



D''j"'j3n niQDn mu 



DEANA PREISER 



EVELYN RABINOWITZ 



Undonbteclly one of tne most re- 
spected and admired girls in the 
school, this class leader has re-, 
ceived much fan mail from in- 
stitutions of higher learning. The 
junior member of the class, 
Deana never allowed her elders 
o outshine her in the pursuit of 
her scholastic and extra-curri- 
cular interests. Her future success 
^vill blaze many new horizons 
for our school. 

Chapter president, Arista; He- 
brew editor, Elchanet; president, 
CO.; class president 



One of the school s busiest plan- 
ners, Evelyn manages to get 
many things accomplished in a 
quiet, yet persistent manner. She 
is one or those rare females who 
has not yet adopted a bouffant 
coiffure or some other stylistic 
fad. Evvy's peppy personality 
and gay disposition have made 
her one of the class favorites. 

Arista; vice-president, CO.; 
class vice-president; basketball 



25 



AVIVA SCHONFELD 



FELICE ROSENBERG 



Attaining the top scholastic aver- 
age and the most service credits 
in the senior class was not real- 
ly a hard task for Fehce. The 
woman-behind-the-scenes of Mr. 
Cohen's successful publishing 
business, she has overwhelmed 
her classmates with her sparkling 
personality, her glowing red 
cheeks, and the most obvious 
blush in the room. The sum total 
—a girl who has everything. 

Arista; editor-in-chief, Elchanel; 
editor - in - chief. Courier; class 
president; captain, basketball; 
volleyball 



imn ns^i 'pdqj mm 

nnoN 




Perennial class president, Aviva 
has borne the brunt of Mr. Lil- 
ker's diverse moods more than 
any of us, thereby earning the 
gratitude and admiration of her 
class. Her creative abilities and 
originality have made her an in- 
valuable director of class produc- 
tions. Despite her many suc- 
cesses, though, she remains a 
charming, unassuming ' g'irl, re- 
spected by all. 

Secretary, CO.; English staff, 
Elchanet; class president; cap- 
tain,, cheering squad; captain, 
boosters 




r^^'^nH 






26 



?DN^ nnoj mun nnuoj 'd 
nnujn 



nrSs? 





NILI SILVERMAN 



FLORENCE SCHWIMMER 



The paper companies can thank 
their lucky stars for Flo, our 
most conscientious notetaker. Al- 
though her other classroom oc- 
cupations include filing nails. 
Florence has still managed to 
maintain a high scholastic aver- 
age. A sweet girl fidl of good in- 
tentions. Flo has earned many 
friends. 

Chapter vice-president. Arista; 
a(/i/p(ic manager: hasketoall; vol- 
leyball; leader, chalil club 



Entering the school with a pony 
tail, pretty and well-dressed Nili 
graduates with a somewhat more 
bouffant style. Israeli born, she 
speaks a fluent Hebrew and is a 
devoted "Massadnik." Loving 
mischief and adventure. Nili is 
a true senior, and has been for 
three years. 

CO.: Hamvaser: Guild volun- 
teer; cheering squad 



27 



Clubs; committees 



jj^is'^n 



HELENE WEILGUS 



A delegate from the East Side, 
Helene s bright eyes and charm 
have won many a friend here. A 
future bio-chemistry major, she 
hopes to be a science teacher or 
researcher. However, her uhimate 
goal is Aliyat Artza, and pre- 
haps the future will see Helene 
teaching science to the children 
of Israel. 




UTX} in^T] WRU] I'u in 



nin 



nniNn "id^ im^n nun 




HAVVAH WEINSTEIN 

Known for her smile and quiet 
\vays, Hawaii often gives the er- 
roneous impression of total sweet- 
ness. Actually, she is a girl of 
iron will who lights stubbornly 
lo get her opinions across. Plan- 
ning to major in education, this 
New Jerseyite enters college with 
all our good wishes. 

CO.; service squad; volleyball; 
booster 



28 





^MI^ 



fi 







We came in September, 1959, found P.S. 
141 and were told to come back next year. 



D 



^ 



lene Lipstadt 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 

We entered our "newly renovated" edifice 
with trepidation, but it was too late to 
change ... Or was it? . . . Rebecca leaves 
to return to leave to . . . Touring the school, 
we learn that the third floor, the fourth 
floor, and the lab are off limits, but the 
boys' bathroom is ours. . . . Chumash is 
taught by Castro ; and English by a Canadian 
continental dresser with connections "Up- 
town. " Everyone loves him, but Havvah falls 
hardest. ... We do busy work for Art, home- 
work for French, and learn how to earn a liv- 
ing in Bio. . . . Mishnah is spent amassing 
zeroes— "Koait" . . . and Ivris on one foot. 
. . . Only from an itchy Geometry book can 
you learn what a couple of interesting curves 
can do to squares. . . . M.L. smiled and the 
world smiled with him. . . The second time 
we trembled. ... As beatniks we honor 
Thanksgiving, and Myril sees Albany in her 
Chrystall ball. ... We ruin a fire drill , are 
disqualified from the elections and choose 
Deana president for the first of three times. 
... We play "hide-and-seek" and announce 
Miss Riback's child-bride-hood to the Fifth 
Avenue bus. . . . The mouse roars as we meet 
for intersession. ... We roar when greeted 
by Rabbi Berenholz' gestures and Mrs. Lev- 
inson's modern art. . . . What a change from 
trees. . . . Helenie institutes the tradition 
of Steif retests. . . . Round and round goes 
the Guggenheim, but we behave this time. . . . 
The Soph weekend leaves us hoarse as the team 
begins the three-year tradition of basket- 
ball losses. We go en masse to see Ben Gurion 
and M.L. loses his class to Dean Bacon? . . . 
The J. E.G. gets us disqualified from the 
sing, but for nought. "Soph's Pacific" is 
presented anyway, as our year of sophomore 
seniorhood ends on the glorious note of 
"Bloody Marty." 3] 




JUNIOR YEAR 

Sunburnt, we return--at least most of us do — to 
find ourselves still "seniors" with a new naive batch 
of freshmen to bother and instruct ... We study each 
day and study every night for "Marty's Inquisition" 
. . . Mr. Steif goes back to teaching on two feet, one in 
each period . . . "Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou?" 
Out buying a tie to match my brown wool shirt . . . Peter: 
Anon . . . Thursdays the Chem class tries to explode the 
school, and the fallout rate depletes the popuation . . . 
New Frontierswomen all — Jack's cute, Jackie's cuter, 
Caroline is cutest , Felice Hamada is Secretary of State , 
and the "poll" is a farce . . . New class refrain: 
"pachat, shachat, bor, bor" . . . Disqualified again, 
this time it's the Talent Show . . . Aviva judged guilty 
of crooking her finger ... We raise a rumpus and the 
table at the Chanukah Chagiga ... We are finalized and 
regentized-After that I. A." regents we, too, could use a 
pill . . . Our mothers pacify us — It will be clearer the 
second time around . . . Hebrew book reports are easy ex- 
cept when you haven't read the book . . . Rhoda fools no 
one except Mr. Steif ... We travel to school the MondaV 
of the blizzard and are rewarded by another day of school 
. . . Where did you go? Out. What did you do? Went to the 
Dean' s Reception . . . Oh, that Y.U. togetherness feel- 
ing . . . The Oscar to Rabbi Metzger for his role as Rabbi 
Akiba who fell in "like" with his wife . . . M. L.'s 
birthday, and we toast him with Metrecal . . . Jackie has 
a nephew right in the middle of History . . . Mr. 
Schwartzbard waits for us to confess, and waits, and 
waits, and waits ... Lag B'Omer is cold and wet ... Mrs. 
Adler ends up bandaged — Oh those pants . . . Barricade 
the doors, the Romans are coming — Veni , vedi, and the 
Latin class conquers yet another Latin teacher . . . 
Spring, the end of the Sweet Sixteen season and the be- 
ginning of the hunting season — bring a boy to "The 
Mikado" . . . The mathematical "elite" stay after 
school and finally understand Algebra . . . The missing 
link was at Haaren all along. We sing our way to Israel, 
forget to take the proper channels and arrive second be- 
hind the Freshmen . . . Quality has lost to quantity . . . 
President deGaulle foils the French students, and Trig 
fails the "darlings" ... A celebration is in order 
as we are officially ordained SENIORS as Suzan' s guests 
for dinner. We promise to return and the restaurant 
promises to bar us . . . 



SENIOR YEAR 

Not seniors at last, but seniors again. 
. . . Our duly earned rights and privileges 
are threatened by M.L. ' s desires for a well- 
rounded graduating class. . . . To pass Ivris 
you need to know Chumash, Novi , and "Bart- 
lett's Familiar Quotations" . . . Historiah 
hasn't changed — the dates are harder, the 
names longer, and Hoordos remains dead. . . . 
Five foot two, but what those five feet can 
do to a lazy English class. . . . History — a 
respite from last year's inquisitions is fun 
but Faerberisms are funnier. ... "I answer 
me. . . . You look like a question mark. . . . 
Put that girl in the wastebasket. . . . She 
thinks she' s a U boat . . . . Grrr and nineteen 
woofs." ... An edifying trip to Stern — any 
volunteers? . . . The jury box — the histori- 
cal elite are banded and disbanded. . . . Many 
things fly open in Novi, and close with a loud 
rustle — dramatics, crosswords, and open- 
book tests. . . . Mr. Eliezri's quota earns 
him great popularity, a place in the winner ' s 
circle, daily serenades and the whole class 
U's. . . . Undaunted by the lack of a groom, 
Jackie becomes engaged at the Chanukah Cha- 
giga — boy do rumors fly. . . . Senior pins, 
senior pictures, senior dues, but where are 
our keys and rings? . . . Sloppy seniors get 
dressed up and go to the first Y.U. -Central 
social. . . . Not since Doc has Friday been 
so much fun. ... We wait expectantly, even 
engage Aviva as bait, but all we learn about 
is sholom bayis. . . . "Eish Ve Eishto" turns 
out to be the theological answer to "Why'd we 
skip that Rashi?" ... At the senior weekend 
we became very hoarse, very tired, and very 
much lighter. . . . Myril and Helene bewitch, 
levitate, and bewilder, and the man across 
the hall comes in on cue. . . . Mrs. Adler has 
a baby girl. . . . Bingo! The Elchanet is a 
financial success. . . . 




CLf^SS D/SfCT^ 



Myril Adams, 680 West End Avenue, New York, N. Y MO 3-7831 

Su2an Alpert, 277 West End Avenue, New York, N. Y TR 3-9764 

Melodye Ashenberg, 70-39 136th Street, Flushing, N. Y BO 3-1873 

Shaynee Becker, 2335 Walton Avenue, Bronx, N. Y FO 7-8034 

Fehcia Chanes, 390 Wadsworth Avenue, New York, N. Y SW 5-4788 

Gladys Cohen, 1469 Grand Concourse, Bronx, N. Y CY 3-1098 

Rachel Cohen, 217 Clark Street, Hillside, N. J WA 6-0408 

Jacqueline Friedman, 771 Caffrey Avenue, Far Rockaway, N. Y FA 7-5596 

Felice Hamada, 63-61 99th Street, Forest Hills, N. Y TW 7-8215 

Janet Hersh, 305 West 86th Street, New York, N. Y TR 7-5035 

Mina Horowitz, 4499 Henry Hudson Parkway W., Riverdale, N. Y KI 6-8415 

Sandra Horowitz, 1974 Grand Avenue, Bronx, N. Y FO 7-3501 

Vivian Kalish, 18 Clover Street, Elizabeth, N. J EL 3-3252 

Adele Levine, 33-68 21st Street, Long Island City, N. Y AS 4-5433 

Helene Lipstadt, 1223 Channing Road, Far Rockaway, N. Y FA 7-1559 

Rhoda Miller, 20 St. Andrews Place, Yonkers, N. Y GR 6-5384 

Zipora Milner, 110-28 68th Avenue, Forest Hills, N. Y TW 7-4297 

Frances Pincus, 308 Delancey Street, New York, N. Y GR 3-3581 

Deana Preiser, 334 West 85th Street, New York, N. Y TR 3-5566 

Evelyn Rabinowitz, 150-43 78th Road, Flushing, N. Y AX 7-5671 

Fehce Rosenberg, 105-33 66th Avenue, Forest Hills, N. Y TW 7-1432 

Aviva Schonfeld, 70-41 153rd Street, Flushing, N. Y LI 4-1040 

Florence Schwimmer, 1459 Grand Concourse, Bronx, N. Y CY 3-2836 

Nili Silverman, 144-10 71st Avenue, Flushing, N. Y „ BO 3-0566 

Helene Weilgus, 504 Grand Street, New York, N. Y SP 7-4524 

Havvah Weinstein, 629 Park Avenue, Elizabeth, N. J EL 5-4012 




34 




LITERATURE 



35 



Conflicts of Man 



The world's strangest paradox is the paradox of man. 
Man, the creature of reason, is also a creature of insanity. Cap- 
able of the noblest emotions, he has often committed the most 
despicable of deeds. These aberrations of character are due to 
the basic conflicts inherent in all men. 



Man's greatest war — the war for survival against the de- 
structive elements of nature — began with his creation and can 
end only in his triumph or his destruction . . . 



Man Ap;ainst Nature 



Stranded, a small boat is left forlorn in the center of an 
endless, raging, storming sea. Hopelessness and desolation sur- 
round the ill-fated vessel. Yet, the boat moves on. Not by leaps 
and bounds, but it moves. Why? Why should it atttempt to 
reach its destination and safety? Because inside the ship there 
is a man with will-power, striving for survival and his life. 
Has it not always been this way — man against nature? From 
the prehistoric days of primitive man to our present advanced 
civilization, every conquest of a human being over the natural 
elements is turning one leaf in the book of man. 

Throughout the centuries famine, drought, pestilence, 
flood, bitter cold, and burning heat have all played their part 
in this ceaseless war, this fight to the finish. Man has been 
victorious and man has met defeat, but, in both conquest and 
frustration, he has been strengthened. 

Thus nature, by seeking to assert its dominance over man, 
has succeeeded in forging a stronger being, in imbuing into 
his sometime decadent soul a new purpose, a higher ideal. In- 
stead of destroying the human race, nature has welded a unity 
among men engaged in battling a common enemy. 

Man's conflict with nature is a strange one. It is a para- 
doxical war whose aim is destruction, but whose achievements 
are progress and a nobler human being. 

EVELYN CAPPELL 



36 



. . . Man's war against nature is one of the most serious aspects of 
his existence. Quite often, however, the humorous side of this battle 
comes to the fore . . . 



Ch 



amp 



I often wonder why people smirk when I say that 
"Batter up" suggests baking to me instead of base- 
ball. The fascinating world of sports is completely 
passing me by. But please don't assume I'm totally 
lost. Oh, no, I proudly held the title of hopscotch 
champ for four consecutive years. 

I like sports; sports just don't like me. I've enthu- 
siastically attempted every one at one time or another 
.... the world has yet to recover. 

I attribute my crashing failure to the fact that I 
am a "southpaw." In my first baseball game (and 
quite definitely my last) I hit what I like to think 
was a run home (or whatever they call it). The 
umpires are still debating the matter, for, you see, 
when taught the game, I was simply told to run 
around the bases. No one cared to tell me in which 
direction, and, being a lefty, my natural inclination 
was to run first to third base, then to second, first, 
and finally "home." 

Grinning triumphantly, I skipped to "home base" 
just in time to hear the manager of the opposing 
team exchange a few choice words with the umpire. 
The ump (who just happened to be my father) re- 
torted that since I had run all the way around the 
bases, no matter how, it was still a home run. My 
team heartily agreed. "No fair. It's against the rules, 
anyway. Who ever heard of running around the bases 
backwards.'" was the enraged answer. 

This, of course, set off what could easily have been 
mistaken from a distance as Custer's last stand. I 
shyly laid my bat on the plate — not knowing that 
one should let go of it, I had clutched it tightly as 
I ran around the bases — and quietly sneaked back 
to my hopscotch. 

But did this humiliating defeat dampen my fiery 
drive.' Did I let myself become convinced that I was 
totally hopeless.' Did I lack confidence? Did I 
lose hope .' 



Yes. As the world outside transformed into a 
hysterical mob, driven by a blazing, passionate hunger 
for Olympics and "World Series games, I contentedly 
crawled into a quiet seclusion of my own and read 
my way through baseball seasons, football seasons, 
basketball seasons, and snowball seasons. 

A few years later, however, I reluctantly agreed 
to go bowling with a few friends. I'll never forget — 
although heaven knows, I've tried — my first game. 
What stands out most in my mind is the complete 
silence that overshadowed the entire area. Balls 
stopped rolling. People stopped talking. A group of 
men with cigars drooping from their mouths folded 
their arms and chuckled inwardly. Then there was 
silence .... 

With long strides I raced, ball in hand, to the 
mark and hurled the heavy sphere. Hesitantly it 
crawled half-way down the alley in a zig-zag manner, 
then stopped for a moment, and rolled gently back. 
Someone giggled. Sheepishly, I extended a limp hand, 
grasped the ball, and prepared for another try. "This 
time it must be stronger, more powerful," I told 
myself. And strong it was, indeed. So strong, in 
fact, that the ball tore fiercely down the alley, made 
a sharp right turn, skipped across the gutter, and 
knocked down three pins in the next alley. 

I muttered a healthy Irish curse, and then told 
myself that I was an outstanding failure. "Why," I 
sputtered, 'I can't even develop a good case of ath- 
lete's foot!" 

But never fear, dear reader, I'm not that easily 
discouraged. As a matter of fact, I'm thinking of 
taking up the fine art of fencing. 
En garde ! ! ! ! ! 

CHARLOTE SILVERMAN 



37 



. . . The greatest mover of men and, yet, their greatest curse is 
the perpetual lust for power and grandeur. To attain this end 
man comes in conflict with fellow man and ruthlessly seeks to 
destroy the only other being who shares his burdens and fate. . . 




38 



A Losing Game 

Death, hate, pain, and destruction — these are the gifts of war. Broken 
homes, broken hearts, and broken bodies — these, also, are the gifts of battle. 
Youth, in all its innocence and beauty, is all too often the sacrificial lamb of- 
fered on the bloodstained altar of the battlefield. Young bodies, once over- 
flowing with violent passions' and fiery emotion, now merely empty shells — 
forever stilled, forever devoid of all feeling, all caring, all life. Luscious 
meadows lying peacefully under a gentle, caressing sun, are slowly watered 
by the blood of dying soldiers, too young to die, yet too near death to live. 
Mighty cities, stretching skyward to the heavens, bespeak man's power and 
glory; yet the heavens answer not, for the foundations quake and rot under 
the onslaught of man's insanity and shame. 

The pictures of war are many, her victims even more; but the eyes are 
too blinded with tears to see, and the heart too laden with grief to feel. So, 
the horrors of slaughter continue throughout the inexorable march of time 
and history; and though poppies may still grow in Flanders Field, so does hate 
in the souls of men. 

War is a game, and all can play, for death has no favorites. What is 
the world's greatest irony.' It is this: that the ideals of democracy achieve 
their greatest heights in times of mortal combat — for all are equal then. Who 
will say "nay" to the Negro when he marches to his death? Who will say 
"hold" to the Oriental when he stops a bullet with his final breath? Yet, it is 
strange to contemplate that at this time of supreme brotherhood there is hate, 
at this time of extreme self-sacrifice there is murder and violence. 

War is a contradiction, and war is a game. The stakes are high — your 
soul, your life — and the dice are loaded. There can be no winner, but one — 
the eternal, the ever-patient, ever-waiting Angel of Death. Whatever you 
throw, you lose — it's a losing game. 

Why, then, do so many play? 

FELICE HAMADA 



. . . Man's infinite striving towards ivealth and fame has often been 
a source of amusement and gentle mockery. The following essay sati- 
rizes this comical side of man' s boundless ambition . . . 



Why I Like Ballet 



Isn't it marvelous to flutter around like a 
graceful bird with feathers of frothy pink tulle 
in a ballet school in Scarsdale! 

Reginald Van Buren is here, and Priscilla 
Van Courtlandt and ... oh! I'd simply die if 
I wasn't a student at the Rayow School of 
Ballet. Why, every cultured young man and 
lady in Scarsdale learns grace in movement on 
Monday morning. 

Isn't it delightful to awaken and be whisked 
away by Jarvis in a shiny black limousine! I 
gaze through the windows at the common peo- 
ple riding bicycles or shooting marbles on the 
sidewalk. Don't they know Monday morning 
is ballet-time for any well-bred Scarsdale resi- 
dent 1 

Mother is so smart! She knows exactly what's 
best for me. Why, as soon as she heard Priscilla 
was registered at Rayow's, she registered me, 
too. 

Daddy isn't as smart as mother. He com- 
plains every so often about the ten-dollars-an- 
hour that my ballet instruction costs. He should 
realize how important the Rayow school is. 

I think I'm pretty smart, though. I can plainly 
see all the advantages of going to the Rayow 
School of Ballet. How many other four-year- 
olds know that! 

RHODA MILLER 



Can One Compare? 

What is the fairer, the eve or the dawn, 

The stars or the sun of a man's life? 

The deep, restful sleep or the fresh glorious 

reawakening, 
The hush and mystery of darkness or the 

beauty and joy of life? 

How can one con/pare thee! 

Is it not as a blooming rose and a wilted floiver, 

And yet, as a tiny bird and an opened blossom 

Bursting with the fulness of life; 

And who can say which is the lovelier? 

The fiery wings of youth, longing to soar 

higher and higher, 
Proud and strong; burning with the desire to 

live, to love, 
So tender and yet so cruel 
With the fierce indifferent heart of youth .... 

Indifferent to the wisdom and gentleness 
that may be learned only through living 
and understanding; 

Careless to the older, humbled eagle 
flying ahead in the sky; 

Desire lost, but Wisdom gained. 

YAEL SIDON 



39 




The lights of New York City are 
the punctuation marks of life. Life is 
reflected in the darkness of the East 
River, as diamonds sparkling on the 
blackness of a velvet background. One 
light that should be scintillating is omi- 
nously dark. This, the extinguishing of 
the beacon of my life, is the cause of 
my being here on the parapet of the 
bridge. 

They say as you stand on the brink, 
it's dangerous to reflect. Yet, as one 
reaches the end of life, it is only hu- 
man to contemplate the mistake that 
can lead a man to take his own life. 
I cannot be accused of cowardice, and of 
the inability to face reality. My sui- 
cide will be an act of courage. I can- 
not be complimented for self-martyr- 
dom or hari-kari, for it is not on princi- 
ple that I die. My death will be an 
atonement, a punishment for lack of 
principle. I shall even admit to myself 
that it will be a self-decreed death- 
sentence for crimes against humanity. 



Why had I not revolted? One extra 
vote, my vote, would have insured the 
continuation of the flame of hope, the 
steady beacon among the flickering 
lights, die endless glass-towered sym- 
bol of international order and brother- 
hood among men. My personal acquie- 
scence could have kept kindled that 
light of hope and peace. Now it is too 
late for anything but prayer in the face 
of death and the end of civilization. 
Now the lights of the United Nations 
are no longer reflected in the mirror of 
the river. 

"Move along, it's late, later than 
you think." The voice of a policeman, 
urging me on. 

How right he is! It's later than I 
thought, much too late. My chance is 
gone. Humanity, it's later than you 
think, for your chance is gone, too! 

They say as you stand on the brink, 
it's dangerous to reflect. 

HELENE LIPSTADT 



The Quest 



The sky is growing dark as if in a scowl, 
But it is not the sky growing dark. 
The rain is falling in big ivet drops, 
But it is not the rain that is falling. 
Thunder is breaking out in loud cracks. 
But it is not thunder I hear. 
The earth is bleeding, 
But it is not the earth that bleeds. 

My face is growing dark, for I am angry and 

hurt. 
My tears are falling, I cannot control their 

flow. 
My spirit is lashed by a tide of sorrow. 
My soul is broken by the hollowness of 

failure. 



I lift my head although I wish to cry. 
I take my broken soul and strive to mend 

the pieces. 
I face the world with tiew conviction and 

strength. 
I raise my eyes to heaven and seek. 

The sun shines as if to smile after the rain. 
The earth is drying and being enriched again, 

serene. 
The rain has moistened the leaves and 

disappeared. 

EVELYN BERGER 



In Solitude 

Often when I sit in solitude, 
Weighted with yesterday's sorrows. 
Dreaming of glories to be, 
Lost in the wave of time — my life — 
Time see?ns to stop. 



The past is gone, pushing back 
Each passing second, behind; 
The future lies beyond my thoughts. 
'Tis ahead of me — a moment away— 
But where am I? 



What am I today in time? 

I am yesterday's hopes 

And tofnorrow's memories. 

Now is never. There is no present. 

I am the past and the future. 

JOSEPHINE SEBROW 



41 



. . . The birth of a Jewish child brings with it great joy and 
happiness, but, perhaps, more than i?i any other religion, it 
entails many responsibilities and obligations. The holiness of 
birth and childhood is always evident in the feivish home . . . 



Birth of a Jew 



The three stood together, excited 
and full of anxiety. The older man and 
his wife gazed thoughtfully at their son 
who was about to become a father. 

As the mother looked lovingly at 
her own fiirst-born, she remembered 
what his birth had meant to her and 
to her husband. She thought of the 
Brit Mila, which gave her son his right- 
ful heritage, a place among the sons 
of Israel. Being the first-born, he had 
also had a Pidyon Ha Ben, the cere- 
mony wherein the eldest son is re- 
deemed. 

She pictured him as he stood at his 
father's side in the synagogue, proudly 
wearing a new Talis. She remembered 
the expression of awe and wonderment 
as his small, upturned face gazed at the' 
Ner Tamid, the Eternal Light, glowing 
softly in the House of the Lord. 

She looked then at her husband and 
remembered his joy upon hearing his 
son first recite the "Modeh Ani." They 
had laughed together at his futile at- 
tempts at pronouncing the words of 
this ancient blessing. Yes, they had been 
proud of their Jewish child. 



The father also reflected upon his 
son's past. He thought of the many 
unaswerable questions that his son had 
asked: "Where is G-d?" ""How do we 
know that He really is the right G-d.'*" 
Those questions had but one answer — 
faith; and seeing the strong, assured 
faith of the father had given faith and 
courage to the son. 

The father now recalled his son's 
Bar-Mitzvah. He though of being called 
to the Torah to utter the "Baruch Shep- 
tarani" — "Blessed is G-d who relieveth 
me from this responsibility" — and re- 
membered how he had wished that he 
could forever bear the punishment of 
his son's sins, and thereby keep him 
free from sorrow. 

Both parents had stood by their son 
at his wedding, and had given him to 
a girl who would grow with him and 
care for him, as they had for so many 
years. Now this girl was giving their 
son life, and a reason for living. She 
was bearing him a child to love, to 
admonish, and to raise as a true Jew, 
a Torah Jew, to carry on the heritage 
of his father. 

JACQUELINE FRIEDMAN 



42 



. . . Music, in the past, played an important part in the 
Jeivish religion — from the chants of the Levites in the Temple, 
to the songs of Zion sung in exile. Modern Israeli music, which 
draws its inspiration from the past, also has a place in the 
cultural heritage of our people . . . 



M 11 s i c T h r o u gh T h e Ages 

Music is more than a mere abstract collection of notes, and a song is more 
than a composite o£ words. Music and song need environment and background 
in order to possess feeling, passion, and meaning. 

Dedication, faith, and suffering have exerted povv'erful influence upon 
the songs of the Jewish people. Their widely varied backgrounds, the thousands 
of years spent wandering, homeless in lands of exile, have endowed the Jew- 
ish people with a liturgical and folk music of unique character. The associa- 
tions, memories, and aspirations of the Jews as an entity have combined to lend 
an emotional significance to their culture and to their song. 

Synagogue music has brought to the pulpit the Psalms of David, the_ 
Shabbat prayers, and the Holy Day services. The modern compositions of 
Isadore Freed and Leonard Bernstein, deeply devout and introspective, are 
evocative of a faith simple in its dignity, glowing with colorful warmth. Ernest 
Bloch, the most monumental figure in contemporary Jewish music, provided 
musical settings for prayers. His compositions have aroused the praise of music 
critics throughout the world, with some even favorably comparing him to 
Beethoven. In his music one can feel the cries and hopes of generations of 
our people. 

The music of modern Israel, harsh and at the same time sweet, symbolic 
of the Sabras — the strong, proud-born Israelis — brings to life the history of 
recent years, the struggle to renew the land. These songs are simple — they 
praise G-d for the earth, and laud the fruits of the earth and the scent of 
roses growing in a desert. They are also fierce, surrounded by a halo of heroism, 
fired by the recollection of the fight for freedom. 

Music and song have played decisive roles in the national awakening of 
many peoples. It is to be hoped that Jewish songs will always be remembered 
and will serve to do the same for young Jews everywhere, to strengthen their 
identity and further a pride in their cultural and spiritual heritage. 

HELENE WEILGUS 43 



. . . The Jewish religion is immortal — it was the first and 
will be the last. It has its foundations in love and nobility; 
as long as it exists, so will humanity . . . 



Eternity 



Eternity, though an incomprehens- 
ible concept for any mortal, is one of 
the basic tenets of the Jewish faith. 
The foundations of Judaism — G-d, the 
Torah, and the Jewish Nation — are 
rooted in this concept. 

G-d — the Eternal One — keeps an un- 
ceasing vigil over the world and a time- 
less supervision over the actions and 
deeds of each of His creations. One of 
the basic principles of Judaism is our 
belief in the immortality of G-d. He 
is past, present, and future, embodied 
in One Being. 

The Torah is also everlasting — not 
as an intangible and pervading spirit, 
but a concrete and practical guide to 
men's lives upon this earth. Even during 
the most trying periods of Jewish his- 
tory, the Or Torah — the Eternal Light 
of learning — brightened at least one 
crevice in this great earth, preserving 
the flickering flame until the time when 
it would once again become a blazing 
torch filling the globe with its death- 
less glow. It is the Eternal Light pre- 
served in synagogues around the world 
that today symbolizes the flame of 
Torah; and it is the Jewish devotion to 
learning that preserves this light for 
a future when all mankind will shine in 
its radiance. 



The Jewish Nation— Am Yisrael — 
has in its indestructibility defied the 
laws of nature and of men. Beginning 
with Abraham — who, the Midrash tells 
us, defied the accepted law by escap- 
ing death in Nimrod's fiery pit — the 
Jewish Nation has survived seemingly 
insurmountable threats lashing it 
against the shores of history. Through- 
out tumultuous centuries of persecution 
and martyrdom — from Egyptian slav- 
ery, Greek defilation, Roman domina- 
tion, and Persian hatred to the atroci- 
ties of the Hitlerian hordes — by the 
grace of G-d and by its own stubborn 
and deep faith, the Jewish Nation has 
survived. 

It is this infinity of G-d, of the 
Torah, and of the Jewish Nation that 
culminates in the eternity of the human 
soul. This life, say our Sages, is but a 
corridor through which one prepares to 
enter the magnificent kingdom of the 
hereafter, the eternal resting place for 
every human soul. Thus does eternity 
affect the daily actions of Jews today, 
just as it has affected the actions of our 
fathers and of those whose ages have 
long passed. 

FELICE ROSENBERG 



44 




45 




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46 



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47 



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48 



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.(n"j mDia) "xynn] 
:n^aw n^yian ipojr ,71dd2 np^j/a .D^ran ^z:'n i]"''7n:^;2 D^ai d:^ 

.nan3i ]i3i:^nn n^Dna ,(n'z:i3nuDK) niiDna .nKiDia 
.nsiDiz: onDnn "nnDn,, "7^31 '7njn -i-ni^^an ,''i'7n mm-' 'm 
'7n:^n tidd n^a^xin .nnns D^'yiaai hkidi^ poy id da D'^ain 
n]2n'7 noo lasy"? nnp mm myi^n nt:>'DT nx nn:in "nnn nj!:';^,, 

nn D"i272i'7ip'7 my n'7K mm'7 .D^ai^nDONn mmVn nx '?'7T^ dai 
.mi:;j?-B?z:nn nxan niD2 Dn'nv'7:^n2 r]m m ipDn'7 
-|-ns ]i;^]2; lm^ wyiT^i s^^ n^n ,nj'7^ia iix:;n ,in^'7N ^ai d:i 
TiTTT] mK'7 lonnii' n;^ 'D3„ -.-im ]ixjn .nn2j;'7 m;23nn noo nmna 
"H-nnn ni^Dnn nn'' nxa nr nmj;'7 i"? ion"' maDna 
r]^VT2 y?:^ nsix ^d,, riVan in nm nx hd^ ]^2a yia 7ai'7n 

.('7 'n D^'7nn) "inpsn "-d ms 121 inDin •'d u;ijx na .-I'mjr^jjK 
DD^rj; mna istr,, :K^2jn in^jrii^^ nm ns ijV i^Dia yian 7ia^'7 

."n'7K N-12 ^a ix-n 



49 



tL'^bti m^"^^ ^\)... 



ion ni'?'')::: 

.n''an"i "7;:^ mia nyai] nnon m'?''^::^ 
n^sDiiV ,D^'7'?aiK'7 nnnsi ni^in mi suana o^amn man 
"7X1^^^ T^«^ n^aiV 13K D^amn ma nx .ms2 D^jinin n'?N Vd"?! 
KIT 7'an sV ]3Vt v^vr2 "73 "rj; vam ."iiim mm Vk sini:; 
ion "7an n^ni:''' x^pt ]^v ~id3' mm invnn .nvinn njr uDii^an 

.ram 2-13 nvia"? 
non"' ns ij"? onxnai 'i "i^ n^'amn ma ns D^^^ma Vm 
Vy nma ,0^'?^ 'n .n"3pn "^a? vmai:^ ^1^ nnnm ^s"? .inn ma"? 
ma n'opn n^';:' xVaVx .rin mai n-'amn ma ,vrma ^n^ 
nasii:; ins"? idVi .D^pnn'? "pid^ D'7ij?n '^n sV nn riiaV n^amn 

.v'u ,2"-' 'D ,n3"i n^a^sian 
3"nn]^ nsTii:' ivm a'^iyn ns in"? qv "733 yav r\"i\?r\ 
.(3'7 a T'7) n^amn no3 "py 3u^ri inn nd3 ns Kin 3ny n'piyn 
."S3am„ Vin iii:;''?3 n"3pn xipi ,D'amn ma .inia nxDai 
nx mij?"? mii:'3sn dik"? iV nin^];:' d^j77v "^xi^^ ■']3 
pi ."mTjn y-i nx I'T-sya npisi ,n'7Dm n3wn„ ■'3 'n ^am 
Qnn3 D"'3it: n''i:?j;ai n3i^n„ :r^ a m3K ^"122 -lasj dj 
■pk; nsi:i bv nn^ia mn 3in ^'?^m„^ ."min^sn ^3D3 (]ja3) 
nK;p3 nVDn ip^i .('t m3n3) "D^amn ]a lasy yaa^ Vk dix 

.n^am 
mmi x\m Kin na„ .n"3pn "7^ vnna3 pnm"? dtk 3^n 
D'iam nn Vki^^ 'is .(V^p n3a?) "□inn iiin n-'n nnK n^^ 
vn"'3 nv-i3n "rj? nman,, Vk-iu;''3 V'th i^ni D^ia^Di .o^jam "'in 
D^aao nt:''?!:^ :nT fj?3i .(n""? nr3) ir3K Dm3K "7^ ijnia Kinii^ 
ma riK .(io'7 man'') anon •'Vai:^! n''3i:7"3 D'^am it naiKn ti^' 
miD 'U71K "^y nnnt:; la-'nK nmnKa nii/iTn ii'pnp D'amn 

.anmu"? '?'7Dnm 
nntt'n iina"? ini:' ,m:jn m3?:? ina Mn 'd"? ,n^amn ma 

."D^awn la r'rj; n'-ama mn3n b'^ oman,, :K"3p 
n'p'r^a n3Da3 naK] i3i inrs K^n m^am njr3i:a nii'Kn 

."]n nr^am n^'ira,, .•t"' 



50 



r?n')ia)in ^^.. 



.m^mpTi miajr pi^2 pnsn 
nna na'7U73„ mamp D''n''-ipa ijs rxi:; .nrn pin 

.n'7Dnn ."i^i^ miajrn 
rninjr n^pz^n ns ran"? dj "^dij hds "^y noi] q'pis 

.t^'aa miny iman 
."nwv\> nv'^s S12 lu/s,, /'ni:'3;an nb^y„ sip] iia'pijr 
,"nDN'?a nt^^yn □•'z:^ nt:?ii?„ .'7ijrD'7i ^iny"? msn rms;3 
HDiD nDN"?^ nay fsi:? min "73%, .n^n"? nyu rs nnny ^Va 
.(n"D mns) ."iny nmiJi n'^on 
'zssy'? ^JKii'Di,, ,D'7iN ,'?'7n i;2S '"'7 'a 'V ^]S rs ds„ 
rm3j7 pi nrs vna mi:'^'? ms 2"ni:? nnayn "?^]n na 
miny n'7an ns rnn"? rs .n"'^amn vdi^j ns npDoan 
s"? nny"?! "piyDV ms'? i"? ■'iki .nsaisan •'cdh n^man 
7^ny naiD"? ,vn 'J2i VJ2 nrnto'? ns ^d sin inmu'7 pi 
nsTD mmy pi .^i:?ijsn pan "?3 'pa' n^ny nait:"?! lay 

.n^at:' na?'? miny s^n 
n'lriy"? p-i s"? nam s^'in o^i^^yan n^ni 'n niiay 

.iViD n'riyV ns ^d 



51 



vi'iir^i-^ ^ij... 



ims D^nnpan nma"?^ vmm mn^n nno 'S3d nw "^^^ 

mi2j;n inK"? pi ni^'-^n n'ni^an vi np^nj? npi'7n;2 nn^n 
.nimn ii3ii?n ni^Vi n^^' mVaV 2^n nsn i^i^'^na^ iij/ui:; n'ps rm 
"rsya^^' '21 : 'snv 12 ]^v^^ '3ii "psj/i^i:?' '21 1'2 npi'pn^n nyiT 
]iy;2i:? '21 .niin'? ^''ip^ i^ar in' nsi izsn"? ns n'lT mxu^ 120 
^y '\mi .l^?:^'? vt2' Vd m ^'ipT\'? I'ls mst:? lyt: 'snr 12 
]^yl2^ '212 ii:'y 0^211 ,nT'2 nVj;i '7sy;2i:'' "'212 wv n'2iu; 12 
.(n""? ni2i2) nvi r\^v s'pi 'snv 12 
niinn nsi,, : V'ln iZ2SZ32 .^2: nii'oa ima iiaV"? nirr 2'n 
nnnn n2T ]'s - (t" ,t3"' 12722) ""pnsn ma' '2 ms - 
^22 ,iai"72 (r mDi2) T'pjr la^iy n'aai:' 'a2 s'^s rn"pna 

.n2i nyn mann ii^'^ laiVa; 
px ini niin 

2ii:'n ^'?2 j?2ip "p^ l^f °J^ ^^^^ ^2'" J^^"f'^ "^"^n "^^^^ 
nipiVn mjrin rn Tanai Tsa .dt'2 i3'2^'7 7sa 'ii^ya ,nnn'2 
ma2na i:;-Tpn '7ia'72 2'?^:'^ ni2n w' n^? ''71s in inia Dxn 
I'u;' ]DX2 n:iinn sV 'S7i D'''''7'?2n n'lia'?'? n'lr^jnan .n'piyn 
D'^iyn "^N 'la 2ni nriD inriD' nT2;:' w^n x'px ,nia2nn inis"? 
DVjri D'jiinxn mm2 pi .D]aT2 nnn'V I'lyi it rrn^ 'Jirnn 
ma"? na"?"? ^'^ nvn v'^dt ixa n'"? .nni'n 11122^' 2112 pDon 

."Pin 
nNa2 -w .i3nDp3iD2 Vin 21 .li'i'n "^xdi ]ii:'a;:? '21 
nsT ny in'i nii^a laitt' D2n Ta'pn "^u^ DiD'to2K nn:'jr-yii'nn 
nnn — tt'i'n 2in "7^^ n''2i]nn inaco .D""7'72n n'j;7a2 "^nJ 
n"'i2n nisiN2 ni'^niin ni2''U?'n Vi:^ inao'D'? iddh - px ini 

.i]in2 



52 






n 1 1 n 



vam^n n"i''3iN 



-jinn maj? nu;'7i:;z: ins ,minn ii^V "71:? nnpyn init:^ 

s"7S ^^n'iv '^22 n^yD 7Qij? lirs i:'Trnni:7 ii"? loia "nii^yan s'ps 
.nzD'pnn ^asn nopu/n ^d"? .iina i^d] ^nV2 p'^n sin ni:'j?an 

ns i;!2iyV u^Diti' 'z^"? ^inid ,nma:^ nnDi;^ nai "pjrn ,mi: inv 
l^yn y^^-i^ -\\ u^^T2^i2r\ n^noi^n nTiiinpjn minn n^T 
VT^ nDOD nti>^u;a nmnn r^^ mp^njrn D"7ij?n msDn nsi:;"? 
msn ns nsm^^n n^n min s^n i^min .ysun myoin n^nn"? 
.nanV ms r^i mpQ"? ms raw' D'on^n 

.nin nvn ij; ^dizdh nVij?2 3'^] ^^dhz:"? aiDs sV -npa 
•'iin^n mK"? riDin — nann T'a'^n 
mpa -i:ji] ,n-nnn nyT' mn^u/na i^dz: mn"- "^d^? ]vdsj 
"132 fKi .w-n^n ■'T^^n ■'d'^d npia37 HD-iyn '71:' on'' Dmrr-n 
mn'' nan T'a'rn .m'^yj nn;2i miiDn Dn;^ T\^^-\1l s'7nw -sVd 
iDn"? mip„ nnnn nx na^ij? i3^« >f^r\^ 1V3 n3i:^Z2 7123'? 'isi 
.n^'miija nvp nw"? ,natt?"? nms isn"? sVx "i3 
,Dn''33'7 n''7in"'n nmx u^tt' 'pn-ii:^'''? nim moaji:' qv;3 
WW •'D"7K ni n3 D''p''Tna iis .m3'7n n'-a'? ipooi wmix] n3 win 
irm3n nasa3 ,n3iz^ :^m >n "73 Vy ownnn rJ^n 1:^3^ sV ttj^t 

."n3 s'7137 n3 -jDm n3 ion,, 



53 



^^^^ 



v^ 



t,a r>^^ .^^ 



U^ 



n3iDs 



i;^'K-ii:7 d'71D3 in'pyQi imx ima .mxn ns y'la nrn nsn 

vv;v?2 rnxDn nx rziKz^n msn nsn nnn 'd mnn'pi jrnun 

.v-nij^a na'7Jnz2n n "7^ 

DnaiK 13K .nutt'Dz: nnaxn pDnon'? raN?:n mn''? iV 
ni:?N nv'^nn njiasV -\-)V rs o "nz:"?!:; njiaxn rasa 'js„ 
naVii'n niiasn .D^mu D'li'ya ■'7''? msn ns ns''2a ni'-s 
.D'ai:; niD'pa "piy n'^npa nvapj; i3aa nii?-mn njiasn s^n 
on n^i:'5;an pi 'd nvii'ya miija Dvp laaa n^ni s'n 
'7^j?Dan 'ivn ns K"'n na'?::^ njiax .njiaKn "7!:; man nip 
u^^V?2'7 ims -I'^Dam n^avarn in:i>n3na dish ns 

n'''7Di:?n D^anan mniDn "^sa imn ]2 sin I'asan 
.noisai HDiai nm"? imx n^'imai dikh nx nnaj/^^an 
ns .n^rasa •'in n^raxa ,'?^•^^•' 'in'? n"?':^ laxi -["^a "p-k 
IT n''''n min .nti^npn iniina iinsa T'mi:^'TT nsi i3i:j-i 
.rrrmsa ''d'? ^r•>n ms riK ii"? mioa 
m-i'oa iinai na'71:' niiax "iina mmn misa nvp 
.nii?np w nm"? ims nVjrai .is-iia'? ■'"nn''n ns npa a^D] 



54 



It^^pDSTO 



■pn^ij \2R nmu} ^ai nxa 




,''my d:ii nntt? t^d"? iiyx 

]wbr]} 2^7] "pDv iB-'N ni na 

]D "^y ,i:?ijx jiiai nu^n i^ nin 
!'3 m'7-x nz:i:'j n^nn nya i7ix 



Editorial Board 



Felice Rosenberg Editor-in-chief 

Felice Hamada Literary Editor 

Deana Preiser Hebrew Editor 

Rhoda Miller Art and Layout Editor 

Jacqueline Friedman Business Manager 



Shaynee Becker Photography 

Aviva Schonfeld Biographies 



Mr. S. Cohen Faculty Advisor 

Mr. A. Steif Hebrew Advisor 



THE ELCHANET 





A 
C 
T 
I 

V 
I 
T 
I 
E 
S 



57 




G. O. FALL TERM 

Seated: A. Schonfeld, S. Levovitz, V. Kalish, E. Rabinowitz, 
B. Burstein, D. Preiser. Middle Row: C. Sachs, F. Knobel, 
R. Resmovits, G. Cohen, J. Tarlowe, E. Steinberger, M. 
Kent, B. Gallant. B. Glaubinger. B. Beinstock, R. Landes- 
man. Rear Row: S. Tarlowe, S. Okun, T. Abramson, D. 
Kosiner, F. Hamad a, B. Krakow. 



CHARACTER 

SCHOLARSHIP 

LEADERSHIP 

SERVICE 




ARISTA 

Seated: Mr. A. Steif, advisor; S. Becker, D. Preiser, president; F. 
Schwimmer, vice-president; F. Rosenberg, V. Kalish. Standing: F. 
Levitt, F. Hamada, G. Wiederkehr, P. Samuels, E. Rabinowitz, S. 
•Horowitz, L. Hess, S. Rosen, G. Cohen, B. Friedman, T. Abramson, 
R. Francus. 



G. O. SPRING TERM 

Seated: G. Cohen, S. Levovitz, V. Kalish, E. Rabinowitz, 

B. Burnstein, A, Schonfeld, Middle Row: F, Knobel N. 
Silverman, J. Feuerstein, D. Kosiner, C. Reichman, G. 
Haberkorn, D. Preiser, L. Hess, B. Friedman, A Baranek, 

C. Sachs, F. Gottesman, D. Telsner. Rear Row: D, Schul- 
man, L, Alpert, S. Okun, A, Friedman, R, Ulman, B. 
Krakow, R. Ruditzky. 



58 




G. O. EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

S. Levovitz, secretary; V. Kalish, president; E. 
Rabinowitz, vice-president; B. Burstein, treasurer. 



59 




HAMVASER 

Seated: G. W'iederkehr, O. Chaimovits, Mr. A. Steif, ad- 
visor; Z. Milner, editor; N. Silverman, S. Charner, P. 
Meskin. Standing: T. Abramson, G. Wolf, S. Meyrowitz, 
C. Romm. B. Gross. S. Gershinsky, E. Steinberger. 



")\;:^D^ 



HE COURIER 



COURIER 

Seated: D. Mayefsky, B. Shimoff, S. Meyerowitz, Mr. S. 
Cohen, advisor; H. Lipstadt, editor; D. Lipstadt, B. Krone- 
gold, R. Ulman. Standing: C. Silverman, A. L. Lazarus. B. 
Glaubinger, S. Gershinsky, J. Sebrow, J. Tarlowe, E. Berger, 
S. Zucker, C. Romm, J. Appleton, Y. Sidon, R. Francus, 
B. Wolf. 



60 





Sitting: S. Weiss, R. Dykan, S. Charner, E. Offenbacher, 
Rabbi H. Perlman, director of library; A. Levy. Standing: 
M, Reifman, G. Wolf, S. Meyrowitz, S. Rosen, E. Stern, 
G. Wiederkehr, E. Steinberger, E. Stone, Z. Nissel, F. Levitt, 
librarian; M. Weltsmann, J. Sussman. 



LIBRARY SQUAD 



61 



BASKETBALL 
TEAM 




Front row: M. Adams, C. Wadler, R. Cohen, captain; 
F. Rosenberg, captain; D. Lipstadt, B. Wolf. Standing: 
V. Kalish, S. Kolitch, R, Resmovits, J. Tarlowe, M. Gross- 
man, E. Rabinowitz, J. Friedman, S. Kelman. Missing: 
C. Zeisel, coach. 




62 




Front Row: B. Friedman, J. Feldbin, B. Schneid, 
J. Hersh. Sitting; M. Ashenberg, T. Spiegel, S. 
Kaprow, R, Rothwax. Choked: A. Schonfeld, 
captain. Rear Row: Miss P. Preiser, coach; S. 
Bergman, co-captain ; V. Feinberg. 



BOOSTERS 



CHEERING SQUAD 



Seated: J. Fooks, E. Davidman, H. Eisenberg, R. Teller, M. Seidenfeld, 
S. Kestenbaum, M. Kent. Middle Row: R. Bergman, N. Teigman, S. 
Lampell, A. Friedman, L. Alpert, Miss P. Preiser, coach; G. Kamen- 
sky, E. Offenbacker, G. Hamburger, D. Schulman, E. Spector. Rear 
Row: S. Okun, R. Schonfeld, L. Sidenfeld, B. Nulman, L. Sternberg, 
J, Sussman, H. Fuchs, R. Lifton. 




YU 



GUILD VOLUNTEERS 



Seated: Mrs. Faerber, advisor; P. Cohen, S. Becker, chair- 
man; B. Rosenblum, S. JaskoU. Standing: N. Silverman, 
R. Schonfeld, H. Lipstadt, P. Samuels, R, Hess, F. Chanes, 
B. Beinstock, L. Hess, G. Kamensky, S. Alpert, F. Pincus, 
E. Kurz. 





64 



Seated: A. Teitz, P. Cohen, S. Becker, manager; J. Feldbin, 
N. Wetzler. Standing: B. Schneid, E. Glicksman, F. Schwim- 
raer, J. Goldsmith, J. Desser, R. Lifton, G. Wiederkehr, J. 
Bendheim, G. Reisman. 



SERVICE SQUAD 




^'l!3fe 









Congra+ula+ions and Best Wishes +o 



TZIPPY 

Upon Her Graduation 



Rabbi and Mrs. H. Milner, Granny, Velvi, and Mimi 
Mrs. T. Ashkenaii 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Ashkenazi 
Mr. and Mrs. M. Funk 
Mrs. G. Klebanoff 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Ka+z 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Kuhl 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Klebanoff 




Honest, I'm not driving the printer crazy! 



66 



What a nice maideleh ! 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 
for Continuing Success to 



JANET HERSH 

Upon Her Graduation 



MOM, DAD. and IDA 




67 




Beat the clock — vechulu, vechulu ! 



Mazel Tov and Best Wishes +o 



MYRIL ADAMS 



from 

Rabbi and Mrs. Theodore L. Adanns 
Larry, Howie, and Sivia 
Reverend and Mrs. R. Adams 
Mr. and Mrs. David Nemetski 
Mona and Ben Adams and Family 
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham J. Neme+ski and Family 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Karlinsky 



// the hoys in G. W. can do it, so can you! 




Hartz Mountain Pet Foods 



The Alperts 



Suzan Lois Be+te Faya 




■irr- 



W^ell, when am I going to see the P. A. D. book report? 




69 



But they can't win. I'm pinishing them because of the ]. E. C. 

Mazel Tov and Best Wishes to 

Ricki Cohen 

on Her Graduation 




Rabbi and Mrs. Eliezer Cohen and Joseph 

Rabbi and Mrs. Ephraim Zimand and Elana 

Uncle Nathan and Aunt Celia 

Sannuel Graw 



Congratulations to 



Helene LIps+adt 

and Her Fellow Graduates 



Mr. and Mrs. Erwin Lipstadt 
Debby and Nathaniel 
Rabbi M. J. Peiman 

Mr. and Mrs. Nat Tager 
Mr. Charles Osner 
Mr. A. Auerbach 



A Friend of 

RICKI COHEN 
in Honor of tier Graduation 



Best Wishes . . . 
Good Luck to All 

INTER-STATE VENDING 
COMPANY 



Friends of 



"THE LEVINES" 



A Friend and Admirer of 



DEANA PREISER 



Ah! A $25 ad. 




YoH crazy? I don't know how this machine works. 




Mazel Tov to 



AVIVA 



RABBI and MRS. F. SCHONFELD 

VICKY, DEBBY, YOSSE, JOEY, 

PHYLLIS, DEBBIE, and GEORGETTE 

UNCLE MANO and AUNT AMELIE 

UNCLE GEORGE and AUNT SESSIE 

UNCLE BIBI and AUNT BELLA 



To DEANA . . . 

B'racha V'hatzlacha 

ABA, IMA, MOSHE, and ROCHELLE 
BILL, YEHUDIT, and NAHMAN 



Cougratulations to 



THE FIRST GRADUATING CLASS 



PARENTS ASSOCIATION 

OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY 

HIGH SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

OF MANHATTAN 



To HAVVAH . . . 

May from these portals you depart; 

May you be successful 

in all you start. 

Heartiest Congratulations from 

YOUR FAMILY 
BORUS BROTHERS PAPER CO. 



72 



Open the ivindow — will you I I'll ruin my voice. C~ 




\i^ho threw that? 







HflKgH 


Congraiulaiions and Best Wishes 


1 

Mazel Tov to ' 


m 


to Our Daughter 


Our Daughter 1 


^K 


FELICE 


FELICE 




and Her Classmates 


ond Her Classmates 




MR. and MRS. CARL A. HAMADA 


MR. and MRS. B. ROSENBERG 




and RENEE 


and BETTINA 






With Wishes for a Speedy Recovery 




Best Wishes 


to Our Beloved Friend, 
the Sunshine of So Many . . . 




from 


SHARON TAMAR HOROWITZ 




THE SEVEN B's 


DR. and MRS. JOSEPH MILLER 
SHELLEY, RHODA, and EMILY 





73 



THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1962 

Extends Its Heartfelt Wishes 
for a Refua Sh'lewa to 

SHARON TAMAR HOROWITZ 
Sister of Our Classmate 

MINA HOROWITZ 



Mazel Toy to Our Dear 
Daughter and Sister 

MELODYE 
on This Momentous Occasion 

THE ASHENBERGS 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to 



NILI 



MOM and DAD 




Mazel Toy and Felicitations to 

JACKIE 
and Her Classmates 

RABBI and MRS. ISRAEL E. FRIEDMAN 

JAY, ESTELLE, and EZRA 

PITZIE and JUDAH 

PAULINE and BEN GUTTERMAN 

THE LAUFER FAMILY 

Mazel Toy and Best Wishes to 

OUR FAVORITE CLASS 
You Finally Made It! 

DEBBYand MEL ADLER 
and JEANNIE 

Congrafu/oti'ons to 

EVELYN 
and the Graduates of '62 

MOM, DAD, MANNY, and MOISHE 



Well, I think "de gells" are enpying themseh 



/ don't knoiv bow to sew. I play basketball. 1 


ll!|i^ 


PARAMOUNT CATERERS 




■^«| 


"New York's Finest Caterers" 


Compliments of 


1 jfl 


HENRY ZISKIND, President 




v^H 


127 West 43rd Street 




^^hh 


New York City 


ATLANTIC ROMPER COMPANY 


bH 


Congratu/at/ons and Best Wishes 






to Our Daughter and Sister 


FEIN INSURANCE BROKERAGE CO. 




FRANCES 


FEIN REALTY MANAGEMENT CO. 




Upon Her Graduation 


27 East Mount Eden Avenue 




MR. and MRS. S. PINCUS 


Bronx 52, N. Y. 




and MARVIN 






Congratulations and Best Wishes 
to Our Daughter and Sister 


Best Wishes for Succe« to 




HELENE (HINDY) 


MINA HOROWITZ 




and the Entire Graduating Class 






MR. and MRS. DAVID WEILGUS 
EUDICE. SIMMY, and NAOMI 


A FRIEND 






Congrotu/otions to 






NILI 




Best Wishes for 


Aunt Rose and Uncle Victor 




Successful Years of Study 


Elaine, Ha+tle, and Meryl 




Congrotu/otionj to Our Daughter 




MR. and MRS. MORRIS LANDESMAN 


MINA 

Cantor and Mrs. Mai-tln Horowitz 





75 



Who me? /V« one of the boys. 



Washington General Boiler Service 

1578 WEBSTER AVENUE 
Bronx, N. Y. 



Parkside Plaza Caterers 

G\aii Kosher Catering 

56 EAST MT. EDEN AVENUE 

Bronx, N. Y. 

fAaze\ Tov to 
EVELYN RABINOV/ITZ 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Leffert 
Mr. and Mrs. Sol Farber 

Woze/ Tov to 
FLORENCE SCHV/IMMER 

Mr. and Mrs. I. Weiss and Anita 
Mr. Harry Josephs 

Congrofu/otfons fo 
NILI 

Aunt Celia, Uncle Ben, 
Irving and Lenny 

Rest Wishes to SUZAN ALPERT 

Tova Chapter, 
Hapoel Hamizrachi Women 

SUNNY ALPERT, President 

Compliments to 

FRANCES PINCUS 

from 

Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Stier 

Best Wishes to 
MINA HOROWITZ 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmond Lang 



Greetings to 

Mina Horowitz 



SU 7-2600 

Elm Tree Fuel Corporation 




216 WEST 79th STRET 
New York 24, N. Y. 



Congrotu/ot/ons to Our Niece 

FELICE 

and Our Granddaughter 

AVIVA 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Schonfeld 

Mazel Tov ond Best Wishes to 
FELICE HA/AADA 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Laub 
Helene, Irving, and Claire 

Good Luck to 
FELICIA 

Theodore Bikel 

Best Wishes to 

Melodye 

and Her Classmates 

Congratulations to 

MELODYE 
and the Graduating Class 

Dr. Benjamin Shankman 



Helene Lipstadt 



76 



Congratulations to 

ADELE 
on Her Graduation 

Mom, Dad, and Martin 



Lots of tucit fo Our Daughter and Sister 
FLORENCE 

Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Schwimmer 
and Stanley 

Samuel Charash, Licensed Plumber 

1133 BOSTON POST ROAD 
New York 56, N. Y. 

Congrofu/o/ions and 
Our Very Best Wishes to 

GLADYS 

Deana, Irving, and Sarah 

GE 4-7639 CH 3-6115 

Herbert Schechter 

Team Uniforms 
Supplying YUHSG of Manhattan and Brooklyn 

Compliments to 

THE STUDENT BODY OF Y.U.H.S.G. 
OF MANHATTAN 

Weber's Caterers 

TR 2-0870 

We Wish Our Niece 

MELODYE 
Continuous Success in the Future 

Z. Ashenberg and Sons 

206 DELANCEY STREET 

Mazel Tov to 
EVELYN 

Mr. and Mrs. I. Landau 



Compliments of 

Aunt Dora L. Preiser and Family 

Mazel Tov to 

SHAYNEE BECKER 

from 

Theodore Dubin of Daitch Shopwell 

Congrofu/ofions to 
GLADYS COHEN 

A. Zanicchi 

Best Wishes for Unlimited Success to 

HELENE LIPSTADT 

ond Her Classmates 

Henry Vanetti 



Mozel Tov to 
GLADYS COHEN 



Uncle Harry and Aunt Hannah 



Compliments to . . , 
Frances Pincus 

from Robert Steam 

Helene Weilgus 

from Tonnenboum Bolce Shop 

Felice Rosenberg 

from Karmel's Take Home Foods 

Florence Schwimmer 

from Mr. and Mrs. J. Steinmetz 



I heard that! 




11 




]Vhy, thank you. 1 b'ought it in Park on my way here from "uptown." 



FELICIA CHANES 

from Sheldon Fink 

GLADYS COHEN 

from Dr. A. A. Liff 

FRANCES PINCUS 

from Dr. Sol Novogrodsky 

GLADYS COHEN 

from Galorton Fuels, Inc. 

HAVVAH WEINSTEIN 

from Aunt Dora 

CLASS OF '62 

from Mrs. Joseph Shapiro 

FELICE ROSENBERG 

from Juma Quality Meats and Poultry 

FELICE ROSENBERG 

from Toni Rosen 

MELODYE ASHENBERG 

from Deb-Teen Dresses and Sportswear 

MELODYE ASHENBERG 

from Greene's Book and Card Shop 

FELICIA CHANES 

from Century Maintenance & Supply Co. 

GLADYS COHEN 

from HIilda, Herbie, and Nathan Mayer 

FELICE ROSENBERG 

from Johnny-on-the-Spot 

FELICE ROSENBERG 

from Dr. Irving D. Buchin 



SHAYNEE BECKER 

from Dr. and Mrs. Julius B. Rosenthal 

VIVIAN KALISH 

from J. Weinstein 

AVIVA SCHONFELD 

from Pittsburgh 

FLORENCE SCHWIMMER 

from Atlas Cleaners and Dyers 

RHODA MILLER 

from Mr. and Mrs. Henry Eschwege 

SHAYNEE BECKER 

from Max and Sol's Butcher 

RHODA MILLER 

from Mr. and Mrs. Herman Fishman 

MELODYE ASHENBERG 

from Jeffrey Ashenberg 

RHODA MILLER 

from Dr. and Mrs. Simon Miller 

HAVVAH WEINSTEIN 

from National Packing 

NILI SILVERMAN 

from Ira and Natalie 

GLADYS COHEN 

from Sidney Fein 

VIVIAN KALISH 

from Aunt Florence and Uncle Dave 



78 



ADELE LEVINE 

from M. E. Urman 

JACKIE FRIEDMAN 

from Louis Sohen Kosher Meats 

NILI SILVERMAN 

from Dr. Jerome L. Jacoby 

HELENE and FRANCES 

from L Goldberg and Sons 

HELENE WEILGUS 

from J. J. Schulberg, D.D.S. 

HELENE and FRANCES 

from Mr. M. Lesser 

HELENE WEILGUS 

from a Friend 

HELENE WEILGUS 

from Harriet M. Mittman 

NILI SILVERMAN 

from Main Kosher Meat Market 

AVIVA SCHONFELD 

from Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Saperstein 

AVIVA SCHONFELD 

from Dr. Gilbert Schwartz 

CLASS OF '62 

from Harry Weitz 

MINA HOROWITZ 

from Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Maurer 

SANDY HOROWITZ 

from Dr. M. H. Dresden 



SHAYNEE BECKER 

from Pioneer Food Store 

FLORENCE SCHWIMMER 

from Naomi Fein 

ADELE LEVINE 

from Barney Rosen 

GLADYS COHEN 

from Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Weiden 

HELENE and FRANCES 

from Blatt Appetizers 

FELICIA CHANES 

from a Friend 

HAVVAH WEINSTEIN 

from Dr. and Mrs. Murray Berke 

HELENE and FRANCES 

from Willie's Food Mart 

FRANCES PINCUS 

from S. Small and Sons 

HELENE WEILGUS 

from Ben Shedletsky 

FELICIA CHANES 

from Fleischman-Heymann & Co., Inc. 

FLORENCE SCHWIMMER 

from Goldenberg & Tirshberger Meats 

GLADYS COHEN 

from Jerusalem Butcher Store 

HELENE WEILGUS 

from Joel Berger Beauty Salon 



Footprints of the Marty-Aionste 





Thanks, Debby 



Photos fay Lorstan 

Flyleaf Photo by Wide World Photo 



80 



Eastern Press, Inc., 33 Flatbush Avenue, Brooklyn 17, N. Y.